Make Disciples

“The Neighborhood Church: God’s Vision of Success”

My new book is available, and at a discount price! Retail is $13.00, but order now for only $10.40 at https://wipfandstock.com/store/The_Neighborhood_Church_Gods_Vision_of_Success
A great resource for congregations who wish to engage more fully in being part of the reign of God in their neighborhoods.

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Categories: american christianity, Church in Context, Church in Transition, Evangelism, kingdom of God, Make Disciples, missional church, Revitalization | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Caving to Consumerism: Christian Calling or Corrupt Coercion?

I’m in a bit of a quandary, and I’m not sure how to resolve it—or even if there’s anything to be resolved. Many people look to the church for practical advice on daily life. What does the Bible say about how to keep my kids off drugs? What is God’s will for my spouse? How can the church make me a better person? I need a girl/boyfriend; does the Bible give any tips on how to find a good match?

From authentic life-obstacles to a truly selfish prosperity “gospel,” there are many congregations and denominations that provide answers to such dilemmas. And usually these answers follow a particular pattern: God wants you to have “x,” so if you do “y,” God will do “z,” whereby you end up with “x,” and life is good. Because I want a better marriage, children who are more polite, a higher paying job, an easier life, a healthier body, I can go to church and get the steps from God/the Bible. I can follow them and bam! I have what I want and God’s blessings to boot.

I consider this to be, in the words of Tommy Smothers, “El toro poo poo.” It is simply consumerism at its most base level. I will go to church for the primary purpose of getting something. If one church brand doesn’t give me what I think it should, I can switch to the next one. And I can simply keep moving around until I find a church brand that gives me what I’m looking for. And if I don’t find it in a church, I’ll look somewhere else. After all, it doesn’t matter what the “dispenser” looks like as long as my life gets better, right?

I believe that God, the Bible, and the church are bigger than that and desperately more important than that. I am also recognizing I’m in the minority, a minority that is getting ever smaller. Jesus, as I understand him, goes a completely different direction. The call of Christian disciples isn’t to provide religious blessings and recommendations for a better personal life. It is to be part of God’s work of redeeming and caring for all of creation. “For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel, will save it” (Mark 8.35).

Now perhaps some good, practical counsel can help us do that with deeper wisdom and fewer distractions, but improving my own life situation cannot be an end unto itself—insofar as being a disciple of Jesus and a member of his church is concerned. We are to practice forgiveness, mercy, compassion, unconditional love, and grace and carry that into our Monday through Saturday world. We are to show the world what God’s love looks like. We are to reveal the presence of God in the world. We are to point to signs of the reign of God anywhere we recognize them. We are to teach and equip disciples to be part of God’s mission according to our particular contexts (though I think we have a lot to learn about context).

Yet there is a continual call for a consumer approach to church. Generally, people aren’t captivated by being part of a renewed world free of violence and injustice, where all are loved and valued. Rather, we become excited about solving personal problems and taking steps to make our own lives more fulfilling.

My quandary is whether or not there is room for consumerism in the church. Is it sticky enough to use as a connection to people, genuinely caring for their personal needs, and then offering a larger vision of God’s mission in the world?  Is that a manipulative bait-and-switch, or an authentic incarnational approach to mission? Or something else entirely?

What do you think?

Categories: american christianity, church growth, Church in Context, Institutional Church, kingdom of God, Make Disciples, missional church | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Making Disciples: Helping the Church or Helping the World?

It’s time to quit making disciples. At least, in the way we’ve recently come to understand it. In Matthew 28, Jesus does tell us to “Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.” Let’s be honest, we’ve historically took that to mean “converting” them, getting them to believe what “we” believe, getting them to come to church and become one of us. Is that what Jesus really meant? Or is that our own cultural self-righteousness and judgment oozing forth–quite in contrast to pretty much everything Jesus said and did.

The church’s typical understanding of making disciples sounds more like the Borg–“We will assimilate you. Resistance is futile.”

Instead, I think, Jesus lived and spoke about loving people. It would seem that authentic, caring relationships do that best. If we approach the people of the world with an attitude of changing them, “saving” them, or making them somehow better if they believe a certain (my) way, we are in opposition to the gospel that Jesus was all about. And in opposition to him.

Loving them, however, looks much different. Typical discipleship-making serves the church, loving others serves the world. Consider the difference in the following statements, and see which way best conveys your approach to making disciples.

–Get them to serve the church, or get the church to serve them.
–Change their beliefs, or see God already present in their beliefs.
–Point out the errors of their lack of faith, or listen authentically while they point out the errors in yours.
–Preach to them, or get to know them.
–Continue to refer to them as “them,” or recognize the ever-blurring lines between those who serve with a church community and those who serve in other ways.
–See boundaries between who’s in and who’s out, or see all people as created in the image of a God who loves all of us.

So, how’d you do? See the difference? Something to think about, anyway.

It seems to me that following Jesus means going where he goes. With his love. For all. Unconditionally. Period.

Categories: Church in Context, Church in Transition, Institutional Church, Make Disciples, missional church | Tags: , , , , , | 1 Comment

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